7 Things You Probably Didn't Know About Georgia O'Keeffe

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Georgia O'Keeffe has been called the mother of American modern art, and is known best for her beautiful flower paintings, but here are 7 things you probably didn't know about her:

1. She never stopped pursuing her dreams. Georgia knew she wanted to be an artist since she was a child, and pursued an education in the arts across the United States. Unfortunately, a series of personal and family-related illnesses coupled with financial hardship prevented O'Keeffe from finishing her education. She quit painting on three separate occasions, but persevered and eventually became one of the most revered American artists of the early 20th century.

2. Georgia's paintings were deemed provocative by some, but she said she didn't see it. Critics and fans alike claim her flower paintings are a nod to the female form, but the artist never confirmed the speculation. Maybe it's kind of like a Rorschach test?

 'Black Iris' by Georgia O'Keeffe (1926)

'Black Iris' by Georgia O'Keeffe (1926)

 'Grey Lines with Black, Blue and Yellow' by Georgia O'Keeffe (1923)

'Grey Lines with Black, Blue and Yellow' by Georgia O'Keeffe (1923)

3. In fact, her flowers only make up a small portion of her portfolio. She painted plenty of abstracts, landscapes, and skylines, too.

 'My Front Yard, Summer' by Georgia O'Keeffe (1941)

'My Front Yard, Summer' by Georgia O'Keeffe (1941)

 'Lake George Reflection' by Georgia O'Keeffe (1921)

'Lake George Reflection' by Georgia O'Keeffe (1921)

4. Her preferred studio was the backseat of a Model-A Ford. Living in New Mexico, the backseat of O'Keeffe's car made a perfect makeshift studio for painting in the arid desert.

5. She married an art-dealer/photographer named Alfred Stieglitz, who took over 300 photos of her during his lifetime. After he died, the project continued, making Georgia one of the most photographed women of her time.

 Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe

Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe

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6. Though she first gained recognition in the 1920s, her art gained new popularity in the 1940s when featured in a retrospective exhibition in the Whitney Museum of Modern Art. She was the first female artist to ever receive the honor.

7. She went almost completely blind in her 80s, but continued to create art by learning to sculpt. She said, "the thing that makes you want to create is still there."

 Georgia next to her sculpture. (Source: https://www.yatzer.com/)

Georgia next to her sculpture. (Source: https://www.yatzer.com/)